Greenville teacher chosen for Holocaust education class

A Greenville teacher is the only selected teacher in the Carolinas and Georgia to participate in a special course this summer to provide educators with instruction on teaching their students about the Holocaust. Megan Shaver, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Beck Academy in Greenville, has been selected as the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous’ 2022 Alfred Lerner Fellow. The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous provides financial support to elderly and needy non-Jews who rescued Jews during the Holocaust. Shaver and 22 other teachers from around the country traveled to New Jersey in June for the training. Participants were exposed to leading Holocaust scholars. Teachers selected for the program must be middle or high school English or social studies teachers, have taught for at least five years, be at least five years away from retirement, and currently teach the Holocaust in their classroom . the JFR Summer Institute, which includes: providing teachers with an advanced course on the Holocaust; pedagogical links with other teachers and their program so that they learn what has worked and what has not worked; and give them resources for the classroom,” said JFR Executive Vice President Stanlee Stahl. Shaver said one of the biggest takeaways was to “reverse the look” to teach from the perspective of Jewish victims. “When we ask students to critically examine Jewish heritage before the Holocaust, we want to give them the opportunity to examine the perspectives of Jewish victims rather than looking at perpetrators and collaborators. So we don’t want to not that the first time students experience the Holocaust has to be through the eyes of anti-Semites,” Shaver said. Shaver said teaching tools include using journal entries from young Jewish teenagers, the art created by people in concentration camps and not using photographs for shock purposes. She said it is important to never forget the millions of people who were killed. “Teaching our students of anti-Semitism and the history of the Holocaust really gives them the opportunity to analyze and reflect, and for them to recognize that if they see an injustice, they have the opportunity to speak out against it,” said Shav st.

A Greenville teacher is the only selected teacher in the Carolinas and Georgia to participate in a special course this summer to provide educators with instruction on teaching their students about the Holocaust.

Megan Shaver, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Beck Academy in Greenville, has been selected as the 2022 Alfred Lerner Fellow of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous.

The Jewish Foundation for the Righteous provides financial support to elderly and needy non-Jews who rescued Jews during the Holocaust.

Shaver and 22 other teachers from around the country traveled to New Jersey in June for the training. Participants were exposed to leading Holocaust scholars.

Teachers selected for the program must be middle or high school English or social studies teachers, have taught for at least five years, be at least five years away from retirement, and currently teach the Holocaust in their classroom .

“The JFR Summer Institute has three main objectives, including: providing teachers with a graduate-level course on the Holocaust; pedagogical links with other teachers and their program so that they learn what has worked and what has not worked; and give them resources for the classroom,” said JFR Executive Vice President Stanlee Stahl.

Shaver said one of the biggest takeaways was to “reverse the look” to teach from the perspective of Jewish victims.

“When we ask students to critically examine Jewish heritage before the Holocaust, we want to give them the opportunity to examine the perspectives of Jewish victims rather than looking at perpetrators and collaborators. So we don’t want to not just the first time students are seeing the Holocaust through the eyes of anti-Semites,” Shaver said.

Shaver said teaching tools include using diary entries from young Jewish teenagers, art created by people in concentration camps, and not using photographs for shock purposes.

She said it is important never to forget the millions of people who have been killed.

“Teaching our students about anti-Semitism and the history of the Holocaust really gives them the opportunity to analyze and reflect, and for them to recognize that if they see an injustice, they have an opportunity to speak out. against her,” Shaver said.